Posts Tagged ‘Australian Network for Art and Technology’

VJ Sustenance mixes digitised collection @Allsorts Online, December 1

Video jockey Lynne Sanderson, aka VJ Sustenance, will mix the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) collection at the Allsorts Online Forum on December 1, demonstrating yet another application for digitised collections. The Adelaide-based artist will draw links between art and technology during the Allsorts Online Forum wrap-up party by mashing-up the digital images and responding to the classic 19th Century library interior. The event will be set in the beautiful late-Victorian Mortlock Chamber at the State Library of South Australia. Lynne gives a little insight into the art of a video jockey and her approach to the cultural heritage collection.



What style of work do you make as a video jockey? What influences your own artwork?
My visual style is primarily photographic. I used layered and effected video concentrating on movement and tempo. I shoot most of the video that I use. The footage could be either something I shot on the street in Berlin or Adelaide or models shot in a controlled studio situation. Graphical elements also appear in my mixes, blended and affected throughout the mix. Sometimes I use royalty free archival footage. I have a large bank of loops that I draw from.

Often I will shift between thematic frameworks, changing with shifts in aspects of the music. I have recently been doing audiovisual performances with my physical controller the v-tar. It looks like a flying v guitar and it is custom built so that I can trigger audio and visual on cue, without sitting at a computer. This has allowed me to start experimenting with the performative aspect of my work.

There are many influences on my artwork. From other audiovisual artists such as Ryoji Ikeda, Severed Heads and Hexstatic to music video and movies to small things such as a particular movement or motion or something I might see happen in the street. I also take a lot of inspiration being immersed in music and sound. Then there are the unexplained accidents that can occur when I am playing with the software patches I have created. I am also highly influenced by the action of play.


A rear screen projector will be set-up in the Mortlock Chamber, at the State Library of South Australia, where VJ Lynne Sanderson will mix ANAT’s collection.

Your background is installation art, how did you move into vjing?
I have always done both… I actually started my career in the early 1990s showing slides (a kind of early vjing before the technology was ready) with a techno band. It was after that that I started exhibiting my artwork in galleries and then moved into installation works. I was still developing my club video works in parallel to the gallery works. I enjoy showing my work to different cross-sections of people. I get a different feedback from playing live than from installing an artwork in a gallery. Ultimately though, I like to involve others in my artistic process, whether it is people playing with my installations or enjoying a beat driven visual mix.


Allsorts Online and CAN is looking forward to watching you mix part of the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) collection on December 1 at the State Library of South Australia. How will you approach this project?
I have been given some moving images from ANAT’s collection. These have been cut up… and I am experimenting with manipulating them live. I am interested to see what comes out after they go through my software and are re-contextualised.

What type of material will you be mixing? What idea will you try to convey as you mash-up the work?
I will be mixing a selection of ANAT’s archive over a period of years. This will include some documentation of workshops that they have run and artists moving image works that have been included in their magazine Filter. There will also be some documentation of artists’ installations.

I enjoy improvising when I vj… So I will be listening to the music and mixing the works together with a certain tempo and motion. I will play with the material and see what happens. Ideas will be revealed.

VJ Sustenance @ Persian Garden Adelaide Festival 2006 from vj sustenance on Vimeo.

What potential do you see for your own work as cultural heritage organisations digitise more of their collections?
This the first time I have mixed other artists works. It is a bit of a different mindset than using my own video footage and animations. In the process of working on the project, I see a lot of potential to have access to rare early film footage or images. I have been wondering what would happen if you merged/mashed two or more famous artists works together. It poses the question.. Are you creating a new artwork from doing this?


As the world digitises to preserve and share, will you start using new material that you had not considered before (ie CCTV footage, plates from rare illustrated books)?
Possibly… it depends on what sort of access is granted to use these artworks and what I might be working on conceptually.

What opportunities do you see for collecting institutions in using digitised material?
It would be great to be an artist–in-residence in a cultural institution and have access to various famous works to create something new from something old.



Allsorts Online: the collecting sector, academia, the arts and the media
Event: Allsorts Online Forum
Date: December 1
Venue: State Library of South Australia, Adelaide
Cost: Free
Time: 8.30am – 5pm + Drinks
Registration: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s/189943/canforum

Event: Allsorts Online Masterclasses
Date: December 2
Venue: Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) and the Royal Institution of Australia (RiAus)
Cost: $250 per 3-hour session
Time: 9am – Noon, 1pm – 4pm
Registration: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s/189943/canforum

Image caption: High heeled shoe on tricycle, `Liquorice Allsorts’, designed by Ross Wallace, used in `Parade of Icons’ Sydney 2000 Olympic Games Closing Ceremony, Sydney 2000. Collection: Powerhouse Museum, Sydney. Part of the Sydney 2000 Games Collection. Gift of the New South Wales Government, 2001.

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Digital Folk Art – A whole new world of art that is not art: Gavin Artz


Gavin Artz is finding business models for artists working in the digital arena. His previous career saw him working with corporate giants, now he is the chief executive at the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT). As he undertakes his MBA exploring the relationships between creativity and business management, the arts community has someone looking after its financial future. Gavin will be delivering a session at the Allsorts Online Masterclasses in Adelaide on December 2.

“In all affairs it’s a healthy thing now and then to hang a question mark on the things you have long taken for granted.” – Bertrand Russell (1872 – 1970)

Digital folk art comes from open source technologies and associated open distribution channels and raises many questions for the arts.

The price of technology has fallen, often to nothing, as access to technology and technological know how has exploded. Whole open source industries offer easy to use, powerful, creative tools that build digital communities of shared creative meaning. There is a digital culture that creates and distributes online, that reflects on the world and represents it to a community ready to digest.

This is a vibrant, living, creative culture and just as folk art is a daily response to the world people live in, decorating and telling stories on everyday objects, this digital folk art does the same. As with some folk art, digital folk art can be seen as kitsch, amusing and distracting decoration; some also can be seen as powerful and influential art. With the multitude of work created only a small proportion maybe seen as art, the people who create it and experience it don’t care what it is called, they don’t care about the art world; they live and respond to a bigger world, they live art.

If we live art, if our daily lives engage continually with artistic expression, do we in a modern western society have the capacity to recognise such a creative culture as art?



Digital folk art benefits from the change in economic models that the digital era has ushered in. The digital world encourages abundance (Anderson 2006), server costs are negligible, access and software are cheap or free. All work can be made available and no one person is mediating your experience. No one is limiting access to the full breadth of art and culture.

Galleries, museums and exhibitors are at a crossroads. These organisations have traditionally operated within the economics of scarcity; limited wall space, limited storage space. The digital world does not work on that model. The digital world does not need to show work in a building and you don’t have to leave your daily life to experience it.

*What spaces will be the environments in which to have an arts experience?
*Will we know we are having an arts experience?
*Do we need to know that we are having an art experience?
*What will be called art and what work should be preserved?
*Do digital artists want work preserved?
*Is there a role for curators when scarce resources no longer need to be allocated?
*How do artists make a living when it is difficult to show work and very difficult to sell work?

We are on the eve of a shift to a different concept of artistic creative culture. We are moving to a conception of the arts that does not just have its domain as a cultural activity, but one where this creativity is central to culture, community and the economy. This new conception of a creative culture is full of opportunity not only for artists, but all citizens. However, to get to these opportunities we need to review concepts we have long taken for granted.

Gavin Artz will be presenting one of the four masterclasses CAN, the Royal Institution of Australia and the Australian Network for Arts and Technology are running on December 2. Gavin’s intensive workshop will cover the issues facing artists and galleries as they enter the online world to promote artworks and collections. He will be running the classes with Australia Council Digital Programs Officer Fee Plumley. With just 10 people in the three-hour workshop, there will be ample opportunity to draw on their wealth of knowledge and experience.



Event: Allsorts Online Forum
Date: December 1
Venue: State Library of South Australia, Adelaide
Cost: Free
Time: 8.30am – 5pm + Drinks
Registration: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s/189943/canforum

Event: Allsorts Online Masterclasses
Date: December 2
Venue: Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) and the Royal Institution of Australia (RiAus)
Cost: $250 per 3-hour session
Time: 9am – Noon, 1pm – 4pm
Registration: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s/189943/canforum

Image caption: High heeled shoe on tricycle, `Liquorice Allsorts’, designed by Ross Wallace, used in `Parade of Icons’ Sydney 2000 Olympic Games Closing Ceremony, Sydney 2000. Collection: Powerhouse Museum, Sydney. Part of the Sydney 2000 Games Collection. Gift of the New South Wales Government, 2001.

Anderson C. 2006, “Long Tail, The, Revised and Updated Edition: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More”. Hyperion, New York.

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